About your Search

20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
.s. personnel have been evacuated from benghazi, libya. and very small skeletal staffs in tripoli and also yemen. but the u.s. is also looking at other countries. we have ten countries that you just mentioned where there are u.s. protests. clearly they're looking at sudan right now. right now they're not evacuating people. again, they're saying stay tuned. make sure you're registered with the embassy. right now everyone's relying on commercial travel to get out. the roads are open. everything's open, wolf. right now it's just seems to be localized just at these u.s. embassies and not kind of chaos spreading throughout the country. >> these are live pictures we're showing our viewers now from tahrir square in cairo. not very far from the u.s. embassy. you've been there, i've been there. it's only a few -- maybe a block away. but they have apparently established all sorts of barriers around the u.s. embassy. it's a huge embassy too. >> it's a huge embassy. it's like a complex, if you will. even as you have the setback in these reinforcements, they're asking the local government in the last couple
investigators still have not set foot in the ruins of the american consulate in benghazi, libya, tonight we're the first to tell you why. tonight, we have the likely reason and we have it from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens. that was two and a half weeks ago. two and a half weeks that have seen the administration first describe this as a spontaneous outburst even though our reporting revealed that officials knew within 24 hours that it was not. only much later did they back away from that assessment. today, the director of national intelligence, james clapper, put out a statement explaining that early evidence supported that theory so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says that throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our sources specify a time frame for the dni's change of view. again, our sources tell us that law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours that this was a
in the ruins of the american consulate of benghazi, libya. tonight, we're the first it tell you why. the likely reason and from a top law enforcement official. four americans as you know were murdered in the assault, one american ambassador, christopher stevens, that was 2 1/2 weeks ago, 2 1/2 weeks, that saw the administration describe this first as a spontaneous outburst, even though reporting shows that officials knew within 24 hours it was not. today the director of national intelligence, james clapper, explained early evidence supported that theory, so that's why they told the white house and congress. clapper says throughout the investigation, his agency made it clear that the assessment was preliminary and could change. neither his statement nor our source have a time frame. law enforcement officials knew within 24 hours this was a terror attack. reporting reveals that even though the administration says the investigation is going smoothing, the fbi has hit a bump in the road. a senior law enforcement official, telling fran townsend, the fbi wanted the u.s. military to provide perimeter
to provide perimeter support in benghazi, protection, in other words, but that request was not granted. fran's a former white house homeland security advisor. she served in the george w. bush administration, currently she sits on the cia external advisory panel and recently visited libya with her employer, mcandrews and forbes. also joining us, former fbi assistant director, tom fuentes, who has extensive experience investigating attacks on americans overseas, and former cia officer, bob baer. so fran, so the fbi sought military protection to go into benghazi. why didn't they get it? >> well, the answer to that question, i think, is not really clear. so it's not unusual, when you want to set up a security perimeter, you may look to the host country. if the host country is unable or unwilling to provide it, we don't know what the answer to that is, y may ask if you think you need it for u.s. military support, but that's got to go through a process. it needs state department and nsc support, the u.s. military would have to make an assessment about how big a security package that would entail a
have now made at least one arrest in connection with the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. let's go live to our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence getting new details on what's going on. chris, what are you learning? >> yeah, wolf, just in the past few hours libya's own prime minister told cnn's own christiane amonopore have arrested one man. he is currently being interrogated. and libyan authorities say they have several others under surveillance and more arrests may be on the way. meantime, u.s. intelligence officials say they are digging deeper and getting more information about who may have been behind this attack. at this point they say it does not appear to be a core al qaeda group, wolf. >> what does that mean? a core al chi da affiliate groups. what does that mean, a core al qaeda group? >> they think it's very possible that this could have been an al qaeda-inspired group. some group that is not directly affiliated with the hierarchy of al qaeda but does support the aims and ideals of al qaeda. >> and what about the u.s. warships, chris, that are heading toward libya
consulate in benghazi was a deliberate and organized terrorist assault carried out by extremists affiliated or sympathetic with al qaeda, a flat statement just issued. let's discuss the political fallout in our strategy session. joining us now, the democratic strategist and cnn political contributor donna brazile, along with david frum, contributing editor at "the daily beast" and "newsweek." david, a powerful statement just released by the director of national intelligence. it totally contradicts what the administration was saying in the days that immediately followed the killing of ambassador stevens and the three other americans. what do you make of this? >> totally supports what my colleague reported three days ago who was the first with this story. what it makes is the american ambassador dead, the administration's first impulse was to find ways to cover itself and avoid acknowledging the mistake the ambassador had completely inadequate security in a dangerous place. and it did that by pitting on this youtube video of the maker on his way to prison and charged under other offenses. in
generally, not about the attack in benghazi. now, u.s. intelligence sources tell cnn tonight that in the immediate after math of the attack, they thought the attack might have been, their word, spontaneous. okay, this is going to be a crucial word to define. what exactly is immediate aftermath? because the white house and the state department stuck with the spontaneous version of events for eight days. >> we are very cautious about drawing any conclusions with regard to who the perpetrators were, what their motivations were, whether it was premedicated. >> this was not a preplanned, premeditated attack. >> based on the information we had at the time and have to this day, we, we do not have evidence that it was premeditated. >> all right. these same people apparently knew a terrorist attack was perpetrated by al-qaeda within 24 hours after the attack, so the lack of information sharing does not seem to add up. tonight, representative peter king is calling for the resignation of u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice for what he says was misleading comments about the attacks in
.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at 10:20 tuesday night before details of the attack were clear, governor mitt romney issued a statement accusing the president of apologizing for american values. it said "it's disgraceful that the obama administration's first response was not to condemn atax on our diplomatic missions, but to sympathize with those who wage the attacks." just after midnight wednesday, obama's campaign responded, accusing romney of taking a political swipe during the crisis, saying "we are shocked that at a time when the united states of america is confronting the tragic death of one. our diplomatic officers in libya, governor romney would choose to launch a political attack." at 6:21 a.m., cnn reported that u.s. ambassador to libya chris stevens was killed and learned three other americans had also been killed. later that morning, romney issued his own timeline of events, stating the embassy in cairo put out a statement after their grounds had been breached. romney indicated that the u.s. apologized for the film after the attack, which is not the case. in fact, the embassy stat
official has been killed in an attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. we're just getting this information coming in. we know there was also an attack on the u.s. embassy today. this, the 11th anniversary of 9/11 on the u.s. embassy and cairo, as well. erin burnett "outfront" will have moch much more at the top of the hour. >>> few politicians are more closely associated with 9/11 than rudy guiliani. after the attacks, the former new york city mayor became known as america's mayor as he helped lead the nation forward. you've described 9/11 as both the worst day and the best day. explain why you said that. >> the worst day, because it was the worst attack, domestic attack in the history of my c country, or you have to go back to the revolution and the war of 1812 and civil war to look for similar kinds of things. certainly, new york city. and at the same time, it was a day of more heroism, more patriotic fervor, more assistance, more charitable action and activity than i ever saw, ever, in my life. i never saw this kind of desire to want the
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)